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  #1  
Old 06-09-2008, 10:57 AM
eric2 eric2 is offline
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Servo brake flush

I decided it was time to flush the brakes on my 05 k12s at 23k miles, I assumed they were last flushed when the servo unti was replaced in 11/05 and since then have performed flawlessly, but the fluid was now tea colored and even though i had it in the shop for other warranty repairs wanted to do it myself to document it. Besides, I've never had the tank off. I used the ADVrider hall of wisdom abs III brake pdf as a guide. Other than that, 1 liter of valvoline dot 3/4, some nitrile gloves, drop cloth, and mityvac plus your basic set of allen and torx wrenches. The only special tool needed is the fill funnel. I bought the bmw parts listed in the pdf for ~ $40 and used a cut down Lucas FI cleaner bottle instead of what is shown in the guide. The handlebar reservoir cap has some locking tabs that are easily overcome with dental floss, or deft fingerwork.

BMW recommends this be done every 2 years, I recommend that and after every track day
since they really can take a pounding then.

First off is to remove tupperware, you don't have to remove the side panels, but you'll want to if you want to make sure no brake fluid comes close. Then the 3 torx screws for each tank panel and 2 allen bolts for the tank. Once the tank bolts are out i tilted the tank to the rear which allowed me to disconnect the fuel line and the other rubber hose. This gave me
more room to get to the clips holding the 2 electrical connectors on and remove the tank.

Once removed, you have a good view of the starter, alternator and servo unit. I removed the rubber nipple covers and wiped all the excess crap out of the way. The reservoirs are off to the side near the Y and the front is predictably larger. I also smeared some grease on the QD fuel line o-ring as shown.



I elected to do wheel circuits first, and started by drawing off old fluid from both resevoirs for each circuit. I lost my turkey baster, but the mityvac worked fine. You do need to remove the screen from the servo unit resevoirs with a pick.



I screwed on the adapter and refilled with new fluid.



Now its a matter of using the servos to push the fluid to the wheels. You don't need speed bleeders for this. Turn the key on, grab the front brake an open the bleed screw on one of the front calipers. Cycle the fluid through making sure the funnel stays filled until the fluid comes out clear. repeat for the other front caliper.



The rear bakes are a little more difficult to do since the caliper is on the other side of the brake pedal. a short 2x4 can help with the same process, remove old fluid from both reservoirs, refill and flush until clear.

I found i used about 3/4 liter by now, but you won't use much on the control cicuits. My clapped out mityvac worked well for this, pulling through from the the handlebar or rear brake resevoir to the bleed points in the order spec'd on the servo itself. I did have to remove the abs electrical connector to get wrench access to bleed nipples. You also want to keep a rag on hand as it can get messy.




Once the circuits are all done i re-checked the bleed nipples for tightness and began reassembly paying close attention to how the gas tank QD went together. Once the other wires were hooked up i started it before bolting it down to check for leaks. Then for 20th time i installed the tank panels wrong, missing the post once again. Its only a couple minutes extra



Now's a good time to wash the bike to get any fluid off you missed before a test ride. Whole process can be done in an hour, but i took all afternoon. Its amazing how much sweat can pool in those nitrile gloves. Don't overfill the handlebar or rear brake resevoirs or you can make a real mess necxt time the cap comes off.
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Old 06-09-2008, 11:22 AM
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Re: Servo brake flush

WOW!!!
And I'm just about due for a flush!
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Old 06-10-2008, 12:59 AM
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Re: Servo brake flush

You missed the part about compressing the brake caliper pistons? You can do the job with out the over priced funnel as well. Just pour the fluid directly into the appropriate holes.Worked for me.
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Old 06-10-2008, 11:15 AM
eric2 eric2 is offline
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Re: Servo brake flush

Yes, I did not compress the pistons all the way back in, I used the pdf as a guide and not gospel. I flushed until there was clear fluid being discharged. I'm sure you can fill it without a funnel too but with a one man operation and the chance of spillage, running it dry, or adding sweat, i'll use the funnel which works on the 12gs just as well. Money well spent IMO.
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Old 01-11-2015, 03:37 PM
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Re: Servo brake flush

My motorcycle is a 2006 BMW K1200R with ABS servo assist purchased new. Build date is September 2005 per VIN plate and purchased November 2006. Service record shows a brake fluid flush November 2007 from dealer and none since then. I recall having replaced all the pads myself at least once on this bike during ownership but none are recorded.

Not all BMW motorcycles with ABS have the servo assist. My K-bike does, but my 1999 R1100 GS has ABS but no servo-assist. You can confirm servo-assist by the whining noise it will make when the bike is turned on and the control is activated.

The servo assist system isolates the brake system into two circuits: a wheel circuit between the ABS system and the calipers and a control circuit between the lever or pedal and the ABS system under the tank. A total of four circuits must be bled to replace all the fluid: wheel front, wheel rear, control front, control rear. Because the control and wheel circuits are isolated from each other, bleeding at the caliper nipple and filling at the reserve cylinder will NOT produce the desired results. The fill must be done at the ABS module. With the servo assist version of the system, the servo pump is used to bleed the wheel circuit, not the traditional pump and hold method. The control lever/pedal is used only to activate the pump. Later the control is used to bleed the control circuit at the ABS module.

The recommended service interval is every 2 years for the wheel circuits and 4 years for the control circuits.

Two distinct DIY techniques are documented for bleeding the wheel circuits:
The classic advrider.com Hall of Wisdom method uses a funnel attached directly to the ABS filler cap. You can build your own or just purchase it from beemerboneyard.com for about $35.
The pennytech version, described here and here , uses a hose attached to the overflow cap to draw fluid back into the ABS reservoir from a full bottle of DOT 4 brake fluid.

BMW Service Bulletin # 34 002 06 (019) April 2006 specifies that bleeding the metering and integral screws in the ABS module is no longer required and simplifies the replacement process. Only the control bleed screw must be used as a draw point.

On this motorcycle, building pressure in the control circuits did NOT cause any fluid to be pumped back through the reservoir allowing the reservoir to be refilled easily without a pump or gasket.

WARNING from others about residual braking capability during this process. There may be none. Residual is what you have with the bike turned off and the servos may not have primed the system. Used for moving the bike around the garage or other changes during service.



Goals:
Validate the research online and applicability of the R module ABS system to the K. Excellent how-to for the R1200GS here.
Capture any tips or tricks.
Assess the funnel vs vent cap method for ease of use and clean up. I rejected the vent cap draw method as it seemed like it would draw too much air into the system between the cap and the fill bottle.


Specifications -
Front pad inspection is through removing cover plates M3 bolts.
Rear pad inspection is through the bore on the wheel side.
Front rotor thickness: New 4.5mm, Min is 4 mm.
Rear rotor thickness: New is 5mm, Minimum is 4.5 mm.
8 Nm torque for bleed screws.

Tools -
Funnel with integrated cap and o-ring.
Mighty-Vac to draw off brake fluid from bleed nipples neatly. Vacuum was only used for clearing the hoses from the bleed screws. It was not used to draw fluid through the system.
Battery system charger.
Small needle nose pliers
8 mm Allen wrench for fill caps.
7 mm box wrench for ABS bleed screws.
8 mm box wrench for rear caliper bleed screws.
10 mm box wrench for front caliper bleed screws.
Torx 45 wrench
8 plastic shims from Home Depot to set pads into calipers.
Toothbrush to clean calipers.
Turkey baster or similar tool to draw off fluid from reservoirs.

Supplies
Brake cleaner
One large or two small bottles DOT4 brake fluid.

Steps
Use GS-911 to check for faults before doing anything if you have one.

Remove fuel tank
1) Overflow hose from near filler cap.
2) Two large bolts holding tank to frame. Lift back to expose additional connections.
3) QD for the fuel line
4) Two electrical connectors for pump and gauge
5) Breather hose from the pump flange.

REPROM specifies Front control, Rear Control, Front Wheel then rear wheel but it is describing an ABS module replacement where doing the control circuits also act as a supply overflow for the wheel circuits.

HoW specifies Front Wheel, Rear Wheel, Rear Control, Front Control.

Never pump the brakes as that may break up bubbles into smaller foam. Always use slow deliberate motions.
Plastic parts will become brittle with age. Hold to prevent cracking and straining.

The rear reservoir is marked as H and located forward on the motorcycle.
The front reservoir is marked as V and located rearward on the motorcycle.
This appears to be opposite from the R1150GS orientation on the HoW procedure.
Any Front or Rear references to a circuit will be based on which brake circuit is being controlled, not where its located on the motorcycle.




Rear Wheel circuit -
Open the rear wheel reservoir cap (H) from ABS module using 8mm wrench.
Hold the overflow nipple to prevent rotation while allowing the cap to spin freely.

Open the forward reservoir cap (V) from ABS module. Again, hold the overflow nipple to prevent rotation while allowing the fill cap to spin freely.

Twist each overflow hose to release the hoses from the reservoir cap and the Y-connector.



Remove Screen from rear (H) reservoir.
Use the Mighty-Vac to remove all the fluid from the rear ABS reservoir.

Remove rear caliper and set the pads to fully compressed.


Remove retaining clip from caliper that holds the pin.
Drive pin on caliper toward wheel to remove from caliper. I used a nail-set and wrench instead of a hammer but very light smack.

Remove bolts holding caliper to swing arm using T45 wrench.
Twist caliper lightly to release from the brake rotor.


Remove pads and clean pads and sliders with brake cleaner and toothbrush.



Force pistons back into caliper fully. I used plastic shims from Home depot.


Attach funnel to the rear reservoir on the ABS module. Fill to half full. Ignition on. Allow to initialize with a whine from pump. Then gently press the foot pedal until pump starts.
Open bleed screw on caliper while pressing pedal.
Use very little pressure initially then vary brake pressure. More pressure pumps out more fluid.
Continue using pump to move fluid through the system until its clear and bubble free.
Add fluid to funnel as required.
Little activity happens with the pedal. ABS pump may continue to flow while the pedal is released and allow the reservoir to be refilled.
Draw enough through until it just disappears into the reservoir.
Close bleed screw to 8Nm.

Set reservoir level to MAX which is just below a shoulder in the reservoir below threads.
Clean and replace the screen.
Hand tighten reservoir filler cap.

Remove wedges and reinstall pads into calipers.
Install retaining pin to hold the pads and drive until seated.
Install retaining clip onto pin.

Attach caliper to swing arm with bolts and torque to 24 Nm.

Rear Control circuit -
Instructions do NOT specify if control bleed is done with ignition ON or OFF. I bled rear with ignition off, but for front control I needed the ABS pump to rebuild pressure in the control circuit so I redid the rear with pump assist.

Bleed recommendations changed in 2006 that only the CONTROL circuit must be bled to simplify the maintenance. Original specification was meter cylinder, then integral circuit, then control, then repeat metering.
Process is slow and there was no change in fluid color. I stopped when reservoir had been replenished twice.

The INTEGRAL circuit bleed screw for REAR is located near the FRONT control circuit bleed screw and faces inboard at an angle

Draw off all fluid from rear reservoir located above the pedal and top off to MAX. No spray occurred through the reservoir when pressure was added.




Cut the zip tie and remove the electrical connector box to make room for wrenches.

Use the Mighty-Vac to clear the hose and container of fluid when moving between bleed screws. Create some vacuum in the container and use vacuum while releasing the hose from bleed nipple to keep ABS module area clear of fluid.

Attach hose and container to REAR METERING cylinder.
Slowly press pedal to activate brake light and hold.
Open bleed screw and continue pressing pedal to full extent per RepRom. HoW specifies to only go to half extension. 7mm 12pt wrench. Not much flows through even with full pump.
Close bleed screw. Release pedal.
Repeat Press and bleed if fluid is not clear or shows bubbles. Check reservoir level periodically.

Attach hose and container to REAR INTEGRAL circuit that points inboard.
Slowly press pedal to activate brake light, pressurize system and hold.
Open bleed screw and continuing pressing pedal to full extent.
Close bleed screw. Release pedal.
Repeat Press and bleed if fluid is not clear or shows bubbles. Check reservoir level periodically.

Attach hose and container to REAR CONTROL circuit rear most outboard bleed screw pointing up.
Slowly press pedal to activate brake light and pressurize system and hold.
Open bleed screw and continuing pressing pedal to full extent.
Close bleed screw. Release pedal. Check reservoir level periodically.
Repeat as necessary to replace all fluid. Guides are non-specific about how much this is but as the maintenance specification have changed, I infer most bleeding should be done from this control valve.

Optional - repeat process on original metering circuit per pre 2006 service specification.
Put the protective rubber caps back on the rear control bleed screws.
Top off the rear reservoir near pedal and secure gasket and cap.

Front wheel circuit -
Front wheel circuit drains much more quickly than rear with two calipers to service.



Remove Screen from front (V) reservoir.
Use the Mighty-Vac to remove all the fluid from the ABS reservoir.


At both front calipers use M3 allen wrench to remove cover from brake pads.
Remove cotter pin and pin to release pads from caliper.
Remove T45 bolts to loosen caliper from carrier. Twist caliper to remove stress.
Remove pads from caliper. They will slip out easily.


Clean pistons with brake cleaner, tooth brush and compressed air to prevent any brake dust from being driven into caliper seals when the pistons are reset.


Use shims and pads to press the pistons back into the calipers.
8 shims are used. 4 per caliper top and bottom.

Use the Mighty-Vac to remove any fluid from front ABS reservoir that was driven back from the caliper reset. I also drained the handle bar reservoir and filled to known good but no fluid should be drawn through reservoir.

Attach funnel and o-ring to Front reservoir (V). Fill the ABS Module and funnel about half-full with fresh fluid.

Attach hose and Mighty-Vac or other receptacle to left caliper. I like the mighty-vac receptacle as it is small and difficult to spill any fluid when disrupted.

Turn ignition to ON position. Allow system to fully initialize after the pump has activated with a whine. Pressurize system at handle bar lightly.
Open the bleed screw (10mm) at the caliper. The electric pump maintains pressure allowing you to release the handle bar lever.
Use light but variable pressure at the lever to drain the funnel into the caliper, the electric pump will do all the work.
Be prepared to close the bleed screw at the caliper as fluid level in the funnel drops.
Empty the might-vac receptacle or check the overflow reservoir to ensure no spills.
Refill funnel at the ABS module.
No change in fluid or bubbles were detected at the caliper so I cycled through two-funnels for each caliper.
Turn ignition OFF and prepare to repeat for front right caliper.
With the bleed screw closed, use the mighty-vac to fully evacuate the hose from the caliper into the container.

Check handle bar reservoir for fluid but no change should have occurred.

Attach hose and catch container to front right caliper and repeat.
Fill funnel to half full.
Ignition ON and allow to initialize.
Pressurize system at handle-bar lightly to activate pump.
Open right caliper bleed screw to drain fluid from funnel through system into container.
Use light but variable pressure at handle bar lever. Be prepared to close caliper bleed screw before funnel is emptied. Cycle through at least two funnels or might-vac receptacles.
Use the final right caliper bleed to draw enough fluid through the funnel till it disappears into the front reservoir.
Clean screen, reinstall. Set fluid level to MAX, just to the top of the screen.
Close up the ABS fill reservoir cap.

Remove the shims from the calipers. Reattach calipers to carrier forks.
Insert pads around the caliper. I cleaned the back of the pads with steel wool and smeared a very light coat of copper anti-seize on the back.
Insert the carrier pin and cotter pin to hold the pads in place. Cotter pin goes outboard and the hole is just barely visible.
Attach the cover plates with 3mm screws.

Front Control


The front control bleed was the most difficult and confusing and took a much longer time. On the first attempt with ignition off, no pressure was restored at the lever after compressing lever and bleeding from screw. Turning on ignition caused a rapid flashing of ABS brake failure light which eventually cleared and went to normal slow flashing brake failure light.
I checked the ABS fluid reservoirs several times to ensure no change in fluid level from an unexpected source and none was found.
I used about 1/2 to 1/3 of a small bottle of brake fluid on the entire front circuit.

I am not certain I did this entire procedure correctly.



As with rear, bleed at Meter, Integral and then control. Or just bleed at control bleed screw.

Remove protective caps from each of the front bleed screws.
Attach container to bleed screw.

Open handle bar fluid reservoir and top off with fluid. The cap can be left removed on the servo-assisted version. Secure the front wheel to the frame with a strap or otherwise isolate the handle bars to prevent bumping and spillage.

Ignition ON. Allow system to fully initialize with slow flashing ABS brake failure light.
Lightly pull control lever to activate pump.
Release control then lightly pull and hold control lever to set pressure. Open the bleed screw to release small amount of fluid and then close bleed screw.
Lightly tap the control lever to activate pump and restore pressure.

Nothing definitive appears to be happening during procedure. It is not pumping as there is very little pressure used at the control, but cycling the control lever open and closed activates and the ABS pump and eventually restores pressure and causes a small drop in the bar handle reservoir but very slowly. The ABS pump is running throughout causing a very annoying whining noise.

I repeated a bleed 2 or 3 times at the metering, then integral bleed screw. Use the Mighty-Vac to draw fluid fully through the hose into the container before changing bleed screws.


Attach hose and catch container to the front control bleed screw.
Top off handle bar reservoir.
Still with ignition ON, initialization process completed and a slowly flashing ABS Brake failure light flashing, lightly press and release the control lever to set pressure at the pump.
Lightly press and hold control lever. Open front control bleed screw, compress the lever, then close bleed screw.
Release and lightly pump the control lever to restore pressure at control lever.
Repeat until satisfied or annoyed with the constant whining from the ABS pump and slow progress.
Most of the fluid should be drawn through the control bleed screw, consistent with the revised service bulletin that specifies only draining the control screw.

Use the mighty-vac to clear the fluid between the container and bleed screw.

Optional - Repeat two cycles of bleed on the front metering circuit bleed screw.
Turn off ignition.
Clean and install the protective rubber caps on the ABS bleed screws.

Finishing up
Remove caps from the Front and Rear ABS reservoirs.
Ensure screens are installed and no significant change in fluid level.
Attach overflow hoses to ABS reservoir caps and reinstall caps.
Wires run under the overflow hoses.

Re-attach the electrical connector near the bleed screws. Do this before attaching the gas tank.



Use GS-911 to check for faults after doing everything if you have one. I had none, even after potentially causing a fault with the fast flashing ABS Brake failure light.
And don't forget that residual brake pressure is near zero until the system has fully initialized. BE VERY CAREFUL ON FIRST STARTUP MOVING THE MOTORCYCLE AROUND.
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Old 01-11-2015, 05:32 PM
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RFW RFW is offline
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Re: Servo brake flush

Quote:
Originally Posted by eric2
BMW recommends this be done every 2 years, I recommend that and after every track day since they really can take a pounding then.

That's kinda pointless! Brake fluid slowly absorbs moisture, which is why BMW (like most car and motorcycle manufacturers) recommends flushing every 2 years or so. Heavy track usage doesn't affect or degrade it, and certainly not after only one day's use!

Otherwise, an instructive post!
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Old 01-11-2015, 06:04 PM
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Re: Servo brake flush

Quote:
Originally Posted by RFW

Otherwise, an instructive post!

Very much so. I bookmarked this entire thread.
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:19 PM
peterpeter211 peterpeter211 is offline
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Re: Servo brake flush

Thanks for the great post!! Here is a word of warning though to protect the ABS Regulator

Wanted to share my experience regarding the ABS Regulator onmy 2006 K1200S. For years I went to mylocal BMW dealer for tire changes, etc., and the dealer would often advise meto flush the brake fluid for $350. SinceI was ignorant of the complexity of the bikes ABS system I would scoff at thecost of the flush and just pass on the offer. After about six-years, the service manager again suggested that I letthe dealer flush the fluid, but this time he said that since it had been solong since I flushed the fluid, that there “was a greater than 50% chance thatthe ABS Regulator would fail after the flush.” He then gave me the price to replace the ABS regulator (I think the partwas $1,850) and suggested that I just change it rather than spend the money onthe flush and then pay for the new ABS Regulator.

Let me say the manager got my attention. I then looked into the flushing proceduresfor the ABS Regulator and realized it was not a straight through system as Iwas used to on my other bikes of the years, but much more complicated. I then located the BMW flushing proceduresand saw how to flush the brake input side and then the output side of theregulator. The brake circuit from thehandle or the pedal enters one half of the regulator, and there are threeseparate bleed nipples for the front and back brake. According to the BMW procedure, you wouldopen each nipple, in the correct order, and then run the electric motor in theABS Regulator to pump out the old rusty fluid. I believed the reason the BMW procedure has such a high failure rate isbecause the procedure requires running the motor to pump out the oldfluid. When the system is closed, therange of motion of the valves, moving parts and seals in the regulator islimited by the pressure in the system. BUT, with the system open for flushing, the valves and moving parts can movethe full range of motion.

Now speaking from experience on automotive master cylinders,the internal metal in a master cylinder (the ABS regulator on your bike) naturallydevelops a level of corrosion from the water absorbed by the brake fluid. This corrosion is minimized in places wherethe seals constantly move over the internal surfaces. However on an open circuit (open nipples),there is no longer any pressure to limit the movement of the seals, and the sealswill then move over the more corroded internal surfaces. This extra movement then damages the criticalseals, and kills your ABS Regulator.

I flushed my own ABS Regulator for the first time afterriding the bike six-years, and nearly 50,000. Instead of using the ABS pumps to flush the rusted fluid from the system,I vacuumed flushed the lines, and used the brake handle/pedal to push fluidthrough the system. In the end it took abit more fluid, and time, but now I nearly have 70,000 on the bike and theoriginal ABS Regulator works as good as the day I bought the bike.

Morale of the story is DO NOT RUN THE ABS REGULATOR MOTORSTO FLUSH THE SYSTEM


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Old 10-26-2016, 08:36 AM
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Smile Re: Servo brake flush

hi guys, my K1200S ABS servo failure, no power in the brakes. and advise, some1 is braking his K1200S 2007, can i use the Abs Module in mine??

cheers*
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Old 10-26-2016, 01:17 PM
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Re: Servo brake flush

Quote:
Originally Posted by Karamelo
hi guys, my K1200S ABS servo failure, no power in the brakes. and advise, some1 is braking his K1200S 2007, can i use the Abs Module in mine??

cheers*

as posted in your other thread, Aviator's answer

No. The 2006 and below had the servo ABS system, totally different.
There is a modification possible to "upgrade" to the newer Teves system. I have seen it posted here before.
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Old 08-10-2017, 07:51 AM
chopper_h chopper_h is offline
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Re: Servo brake flush

Quote:
Originally Posted by GateKeeper
as posted in your other thread, Aviator's answer

No. The 2006 and below had the servo ABS system, totally different.
There is a modification possible to "upgrade" to the newer Teves system. I have seen it posted here before.

I have spent an hour on the search bar with various permutations of servo, abs, teves etc.

Can someone please point me to the article around replacing servo ABS with the pot '07 iABS, please
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Old 08-10-2017, 08:12 AM
paulmogs paulmogs is offline
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Re: Servo brake flush

http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=60520

Quote:
Originally Posted by chopper_h
I have spent an hour on the search bar with various permutations of servo, abs, teves etc.

Can someone please point me to the article around replacing servo ABS with the pot '07 iABS, please
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