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"KRS/GT" Technical Q&A K1200RS/GT Technical Questions/Answers

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  #1  
Old 06-28-2012, 09:41 PM
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New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

As I posted in another thread, I decided that I couldn't wait any longer to replace the stock shocks on my '03 GT. With 48,000 miles on it (45 by me) it was getting to the point of feeling unsafe. So last week I plopped down $1700 for two new legs for the old girl with great anticipation. It took only two days for them to arrive so I put aside all day last Saturday to put them on. I spent an hour or so Friday evening taking the plastic off and the got a fairly early start Saturday morning.

I started with the rear shock for no particular reason and quickly found my day was not going to go as I planned. Getting the old shock off was fairly easy and straightforward and no surprises came up during disassembly. The new shock, with three separate components, looks like an intimidating install. Had Ohlins built the damn thing right it would have been a piece of cake. I got the rear unit in place only to find that the spring preload cable was not in the proper position and therefore was making contact with the frame. This prevented the shock from mounting up top.

You can see the offending cable is oriented toward the from of the bike. It was at something like a 2 o'clock position and should have been at 6 o'clock.


I discovered in my previous thread that Sponserv was hiving the exact same issue with his and had sent the unit back to Ohlins just a few days prior. The explanation was that someone in Sweden had obviously not set the cable correctly. When I called Ohlins USA I was told the shocks are set according to the specifications for the bike. Well, whoever wrote that specification must not have ever tried to install the damn thing. I also noted to the service tech that the orientation of the banjo bolt on the remote reservoir was at too steep of an angle to allow the unit to mount on the foot peg bracket cleanly. I said it's at a 4 o'clock position and should be closer to 5 o'clock. He said he would straighten everything out and get it right back to me.

So I get the shock back and the preload cable has been set correctly, but the banjo bolt on the reservoir hasn't been changed. Great, that's going to make mounting it in a not ideal manner. I get the shock in and find out that the top of the shock is making contact with the frame and I have to give the bolt a few good whacks with a mallet to seat it correctly. It's done, but I wonder if it will cause long-term issues. The banjo bolt attached to the top of the shock is also making contact with the side panel preventing it from screwing all the way down by about 1/8". The remote reservoir gets mounted to the foot peg bracket, but due to the angle of the banjo bolt the brake fluid reservoir is right where the cable wants to go. So I have to mount the reservoir towards the foot peg instead of on top of the bracket.

Remote reservoir


Top banjo bolt contacting body work


The good news is that the spring preload unit mounted perfectly with no alterations or additions.


As for the front, I discovered that removing the old shock was the most challenging phase. I was just about to take a saws-all to the damn thing to cut it in half, but some persuasion with a pry bar did the trick. That cavity the shock sits in is none too roomy.


The stock bushings and washers get reused and I discovered that if I put the shock in without the top bushing on it would slide in place and then I could reach my small hands into the cavity and put the bushing in place on the shock. Then it's just a matter of tightening it all back up.


Here are a couple of shots of the old and new.



I got it all put back together last night and was able to ride it to work today and I must say the difference is huge. I bought the bike in 2006 with only 3000 miles on it and don't really remember what it felt like then, but I doubt it felt this good. I still have to get the sag set and will do so this weekend to put an end to the project.

All told I will eventually say it was a good choice. However, I find it completely unacceptable that the issues I have dealt with exist. The QC at Ohlins must be on vacation right now or the specs for this shock have never been right. I haven't read of anyone else having these issues (except Sponserv) and I'm waiting to hear from him on how is install went. The ride is great, but the journey too this point was anything but.
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  #2  
Old 06-28-2012, 11:19 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Well David. Where should I start.

I have finally finished my install after literally jumping on an airplane and flying to Ohlins USA. (had a scheduled meeting in Charlotte anyway but it was a banzai run back down the hill to catch my airplane back to Daytona.)

After two attempts They finally clocked my adjuster correctly after showing them pictures of how my bike in particular, like yours, was being impacted. The only thing I can think of is that people do actually mount these shocks with the banjo facing into the bike rather than out. Please note that I have looked at loads of pictures of this KGT and RS install and all of them have the banjo facing out. Just for grins I tried to mount the shock with the banjo inboard and there was no way that I could figure out how to route the reservoir hose and mount the reservoir. At any rate, if I mounted the shock with the banjo inboard the factory clocking was still not going to work. As a matter if fact, when I was texting the original wtf pics to Ohlins they indeed said the factory clocking was wrong. And the pics clearly showed the shock mounted banjo outboard.

So I just assumed this is the correct orientation. I have not had the same clearance issue that you have on either the Tupperware or the brake reservoirs. My shock hose clears the brake reservoirs just fine. I can tell you however that the adjuster knob on mine is currently facing the rear of the bike instead of he front.

I am going to take a ride in the morning and try to dial my sag in before I put all the Tupperware back on. As delivered I am at about 42 mm of rear sag and after discussions with the BMW tech at ohlins he suggests 35 to 38. I may need a new spring but I think the one I have is te lightest one they offer so I may just have to deal with it. I weigh 160 lbs soaking wet.

I am highly encouraged by your riding impressions. I will let you know how I feel about t after I ride it this week.
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Old 06-29-2012, 05:50 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

The shock for the older RS and the GT are different as far as the banjo fitting locations.
I had to tweak mine some to get it to mount out of the way.


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Old 06-29-2012, 08:26 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

The issues you faced are totally unacceptable, considering the price of the product. I bought mine used and had a local guy rebuild them, so I was a little more tolerant of the mounting headaches. I was able to tweak the banjo positions myself, but then I had a local guy at the ready if I needed to recharge. No way I would have done that on a brand new unit. I originally had the reservoir mounted on the peg bracket, but changed it to under the seat in the carbon canister spot. I rotated the shock 180 deg for that, but it fit either way (footpeg mount required trimming the fairing panel for the hydraulic line as in Skeeter's pic here:


The adjustment on the reservoir is really a set-and-forget deal for most and I'm not a bling type of guy, so the underseat mount works best for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidk63
I get the shock in and find out that the top of the shock is making contact with the frame and I have to give the bolt a few good whacks with a mallet to seat it correctly. It's done, but I wonder if it will cause long-term issues.
This is a common problem with the Öhlins. Some don't have any interference, but many have to remove a bit of the aluminum frame to get clearance. On mine, I just chiseled off the crosshatch material with a hammer and screwdriver and that was enough. See attached pic for area to modify. If you don't do this, there might be an impact to shock operation as it won't be able to smoothly rotate.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Rear shock interference.jpg (48.4 KB, 40 views)
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  #5  
Old 06-29-2012, 10:27 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by racingiron
This is a common problem with the Öhlins. Some don't have any interference, but many have to remove a bit of the aluminum frame to get clearance. On mine, I just chiseled off the crosshatch material with a hammer and screwdriver and that was enough. See attached pic for area to modify. If you don't do this, there might be an impact to shock operation as it won't be able to smoothly rotate.

I had that problem, no way I could put that bolt in. And if you have to bang it in from the outside, just think about having to bang it out from the inside.

A concern would be this metal to metal contact causing harmonic vibrations, them can be hard to track down as they may show up somewhere else.

Love my Dremel......and my Ohlins.
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Old 06-29-2012, 11:31 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by racingiron
Some don't have any interference, but many have to remove a bit of the aluminum frame to get clearance. On mine, I just chiseled off the crosshatch material with a hammer and screwdriver and that was enough. See attached pic for area to modify. If you don't do this, there might be an impact to shock operation as it won't be able to smoothly rotate.
Good catch & thought! On closer inspection, mine touches there as well. I still need to figure out the best route for the preload hose, so mine isn't any further along than my last posting. I'll dremel those crosshatches a touch to ensure bind-free movement.

Regarding the preload hose: What pathway did y'all take to get it across the frame? My tank has always been tough to set down low enough with the wires/hoses under it & adding another one breaks the bank so to speak. Sad & dejected with the install (I'm sensing a theme for this install task), I took care of the front end & left finishing the rear for another day (today...).

Thankfully I had my wife's FZ6 to do our Sunday breakfast club ride last week .
Wow, how I love the RS for rides over an hour's worth! In comparison the little FZ was buzzy & the "dirt bike" seat on it was low on the comfort list! Even the heat management was poor in comparison to the RS for day ride use. The undertail exhaust made the seat comfort even worse & the engine heat was much more noticeable than the RS.

Some other quick & semi-random thoughts:
I replaced the fork seals again while I was in the front end. The originals leaked a few years back & the oil volume spec was off for my 98' (as was the diameter of the 1st set of seals from my dealer). As a result, those new (3 years ago) seals blew out & this time around I let that "blow out oil level" define how much oil to have in each fork leg.

My steering dampener is totally toast. It leaked out & has zero effect at this point. For the wife's bike's geometry there's no question that I'd replace a blown steering dampener. The RS however is so damn rock stable that I'm vacillating over the need to spend $365 on a Hyperpro dampener. The part of me that say's "it's only money & do it 100% right" is winning as I'm planning to keep the bike for many years.

Nice job Cousi on the install placement! Had I seen your pics 1st my routing decision would have gone even faster! Now to figure out the preload hose routing!
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Old 06-29-2012, 11:35 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Just spoke to Ohlins and I was misunderstanding the relationship between ride height and sag. I, in fact have the absolute perfect spring and will be able to get my sag in the specified range very easily. Still haven't ridden but way excited to do so. Will report in later.
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Old 06-29-2012, 11:41 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Skeeter,

I just routed the preload hose the only way it would route. It is bascically looped behind the seat "tongue bar". I have reinstalled the seat and no issues. I will sedn some pics later.
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Old 06-29-2012, 12:03 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by sponserv
Skeeter,
I just routed the preload hose the only way it would route. It is bascically looped behind the seat "tongue bar". I have reinstalled the seat and no issues. I will sedn some pics later.
Thx!
The hose length is longer than I really want it to be.
I have a route in mind now:
  • Under/in front of the relays
  • Excess hose looped near the ABS unit
That route resolves any tank issues as it wouldn't be below the tank at all. It also keeps it clean of being exposed as it goes to the adjuster. The bend radius's are tighter than I was going for, but as a hydraulic hose, not a "cable", it would be fine. I'll be curious if that's a similar approach that you/others have taken.
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Old 06-29-2012, 12:51 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skeeter
Some other quick & semi-random thoughts:
I replaced the fork seals again while I was in the front end. The originals leaked a few years back & the oil volume spec was off for my 98' (as was the diameter of the 1st set of seals from my dealer). As a result, those new (3 years ago) seals blew out & this time around I let that "blow out oil level" define how much oil to have in each fork leg.

My steering dampener is totally toast. It leaked out & has zero effect at this point. For the wife's bike's geometry there's no question that I'd replace a blown steering dampener. The RS however is so damn rock stable that I'm vacillating over the need to spend $365 on a Hyperpro dampener. The part of me that say's "it's only money & do it 100% right" is winning as I'm planning to keep the bike for many years.


Random toughts, my R/H fork seal leaked after I installed the front Ohlins. Wiped it out and never leaked again for 2 years but then I had to replace them. I think that maybe extending the legs all the way to install the shock may pull oil passed the seal.

Steering dampener is rebuildable if you can find the seals and that may be hard in North America. Don't know, someone here was nice enough to send me a set of seals for when,or if ever, my dampener pukes out its oil.
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Old 06-30-2012, 12:16 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quick update: Job completed! Tank went on nicely with the new preload hose path. I had the "Top banjo bolt contacting body work" until Mr. Dremmel with a sandpaper bit got involved. I rode around the block like a squid (shorts & t-shirt) just as a cool off. It was hot as hell in CT today! Bumps are certainly dampened faster. I need some ATTGAT (with today as an exception) sweepers to qualify the overall improvements.
This years May trip to the BRP/Cherohala Skyway area for a week was great with the old "legs". I came home wondering how much better the handling would be with new shocks & wham, new shocks were at my doorstep! I'm already looking forward to next year's trip with Ohlins installed.

Anything worthwhile ain't necessarily easy! Keep the faith fellow Ohlins installers!
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Old 07-01-2012, 12:03 AM
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Talking Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Skeeter,
Glad you got the job done. I, too ended up looping the preload hose in front of the fuse boxes and it all fit great under the body work. I did not bother messing with the dremel on the side panel. I don't think the banjo touching the panel will be that big of a deal.

Now, I gotta tell you, I buttoned everything back up and went for a short ride. Holy crap! What a difference!

The bike turns in and sticks in mid corner like you would not believe!

As challenging as the install was I could not be happier. I have about 35-38 mm of sag in the rear when I have 3 full turns of preload. It does ride a little rough over bumps but handling is unreal. I will probably back the preload off a turn or two for the slab and hen crank a few turns in in the twisties. Haven't even begun to address dampening. Very excited.
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Old 07-01-2012, 09:01 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

So I got to do an extended ride yesterday to get a better impression of the new shocks. I can now say without a doubt that the bike has never felt this good. When riding down some long back country roads the bike seems to glide down the asphalt. In corners it is much more confidence inspiring, especially at speed. I'm looking forward to the first time I'm able to get up near the Blue Ridge Parkway and surrounding roads to get an impression in the really twisty stuff. I'm also really interested to see what it's going to be like fully loaded with a passenger. I've not had my wife ride with me for the past year since the rear shock was so bad. It would bottom out on the least small bumps. I think I will end up taking the rear shock back off to dremel off some frame/shock material that's rubbing at the top pivot point (and I'm still pissed about having to do that). I'll post some additional photos tomorrow of cable routing and such.
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:45 AM
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Brand New Stock Showa shocks fitted.

I picked up a pair of oem shocks 5 years ago for my '97 RS which have sat in my garage. They were off a GT the guy bought new and had these oems swapped on his brand new bike for Ohlins before the bike left the shop. Unlike my originals, these later shocks have the remote adjuster and the black knob thingy for setting the bounce. I guess I can now remove the shock adjusting wrench from my toolkit!

My '97 had 48K on the original shocks. The shocks were still 'working' but I thought I would put on the new oems, before getting too old to ride the bike.

Replacing the front was tedious following the same route as the OP, except I pulled the forks right down out of the top clamps. The thing I missed first time, was how to get the front shock out.

It was very important to pull the top of the shock forwards to remove the rubber vibration washers at the top of the stem. I disconnected the top hose to do that. Once those rubber mounts and washers were off, it was then so easy to pop the shock back, push it up into the triple tree further, pull the bottom forwards and get it out.

Replacing the rear was a lot easier. All done on the center stand with the rear wheel and torsion bar off and the RD tied up with rope to the frame.

I had to make a bracket for the right side, fixed to the bag/top case side rail fixing bolt to hold the adjuster which was probably the biggest job.

OK they are not Ohlins that need some frame Dremmeling, but other than a new bracket since the '97 did not have the remote adjuster, no problems with fouling etc.

Early days to comment on the ride (which was not bad for my riding style before). However, I have noticed the front and rear now seem to sit a little higher, which is not unexpected considering the springs are new. On our bumpy roads, the ride seemed smoother softer and less 'bouncy' than before. I may also have to alter the length of my modified telescopic adjustable sidestand after the new shocks have settled in.

I have yet to play with the sag and bounce settings, but being about 190 lbs I expect the settings to be at the lighter end unless I (rarely) carry bags and pillion.

PS I have always had a rear hugger fitted to keep road crap off the shock, which is probably why the oems have lasted so long. If I spent the money on those Ohlins I would go for a hear hugger. If somebody made large size gaitors that fitted shocks, I would consider those too. I put them on the front forks after my first seal leak and never had another leak since.
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:48 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

I see Vox removed the torsion arms.I know he has a "Modified" boot at the swingarm, on ours we don't want to drop down the swingarm/RD too much less the boot pops out, big PITA to reinstall. There is a "procedure" when re-installing them torsion arms, that is load the bike with xx Lbs to compress the suspension and set the torsion arms at the right place against the bushings. I think that is important otherwise if not set right the inner bushing may tear off the rubber.

I have done it with weight on the seat or just a ratchet strap around the frame/swingarm and estimated the tension on the straps by feel to the factory specs of XX lbs. I could always add a measuring tape to that set up to approximate the ride height, but havent felt the need, just having the swingarm lined in operating position was good enough for me.
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:49 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Once the bike is up on the center stand with the rear wheel off and the sump lightly loaded with a jack, the weight moves to the front wheel and the bike is stable to pull the rear wheel and shock off. If the front boot pulls off with the rear suspension at max length, then something is wrong with it or it was not properly fixed.

The rear shock is now already fully out against the spring and the only reason for tieing up the swingarm (first) and dropping the torsion bar is it gives a bit of wiggle room on the strap to pull the top and bottom bolts out of the shock. I don't slacken the strap more than 1/2" lower, although the RD drops unless you put a piece of lumber under the rotor.

I read somebody found the rear shock more difficult than the front, but since I've had the rear shock out a few times now (and got the bolts and nuts the right way through to get wrenches on the heads!) I found the front much more of a pain. Perhaps it was replacing the bolts with Hex socket heads. I can't remember what was there as oem, but I did go through a process of thinking how to get them out easily once all the motor was back in the frame. I usually pull the bolts out occasionally to grease them since I found a bushing that was wearing oval.

Now that ugly looking Telelever ball joint is still going to remain a dark mystery to me and best left alone because I found no play or loosness there.

It seems to me that once you start heating up that nut to remove it, you trash the ball joint and have to replace it anyway. I did discover that my 12 volt impact wrench with a short socket will just fit in the space, so I am all set if I ever need to replace it. Although forget the heat, can't you just crack the nut open with a nut splitter or is that too easy?
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Old 07-03-2012, 05:19 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
Once the bike is up on the center stand with the rear wheel off and the sump lightly loaded with a jack, the weight moves to the front wheel and the bike is stable to pull the rear wheel and shock off.
Hey Vox, what's goin on here?
David,
Your quality photos above show the shock installed backwards. It needs to be rotated 180º with the banjo on the inside, and the preload locating pin and adjuster cable on the high side, not underneath. The black cable then runs nicely up under the tank and out on the L/H side. Also, with the banjo on the outside, it rubs on the tupperware with the possibility it will crack the plastic in the long term.
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:28 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Kiwi
Hey Vox, what's goin on here?
David,
Your quality photos above show the shock installed backwards. It needs to be rotated 180º with the banjo on the inside, and the preload locating pin and adjuster cable on the high side, not underneath. The black cable then runs nicely up under the tank and out on the L/H side. Also, with the banjo on the outside, it rubs on the tupperware with the possibility it will crack the plastic in the long term.

According to Ohlins it's supposed to be mounted in the position I have it. If the banjo bolt were on the inside I wouldn't be able to mount the remote reservoir on the foot peg bracket due to both the length of it's cable and the angle of the banjo bolt attached to the reservoir.
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  #19  
Old 07-03-2012, 06:44 AM
voxmagna voxmagna is offline
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Hi kiwi, I was just coming back on what Pbegin said about dropping the swingarm and risking the front swingarm boot unclipping itself.

He is right about that and if you do not go back and check it, the internal clip can find its way down inside the swingarm then water and crap gets through the open boot and takes out the UJ's and swingarm bearings. That front boot is an absolute nightmare to put back, the problem being that oil has changed its size and whoever dreamed up an internal fitting needed their head examined. However, if you tie up the swingarm first and do not let it drop more than you need to wiggle the shock bolts out you are ok.

When I first found that clip inside near the RD after just getting the bike, I went through the parts list to find out what it was and never imagined it was an INTERNAL clip. I fixed it during clutch teardown by permanently fastening the front boot to the swingarm with no clip. The front boot and swingarm are easily removed together from the tranni which is a much easier end to deal with.

My oem rear shock went in with the banjo for the adjuster on the INSIDE (top) as it seemed most logical. Having just looked, I agree on the outside it might foul the plastic. The adjuster hose loops behind the toolbox and back over to my adjuster mount bracket on the right side. I was undecided whether the adjuster should be left or right and didn't look at later GT's to find out. Since my old shocks got set up with the C spanner and the screw adjusted only once I do not expect to be fiddling with this one. The only time I ever thought adjustment would be useful was infrequent rides with pillion.

I hope all the bad reports on the oem Showa shocks I read were not as a result of them adding the hydraulic adjuster? Whilst most would agree my old shocks might be considered worn out at 48K, they do not show external signs of failure such as leaking or excessive bounce. I shall keep them just in case these with the fancy adjuster fail early.

Many here have done an Ohlins install and unless they have changed something I thought it was 'plug and play'. But then when I compared my early '97 shock setup with the later bikes with a remote adjuster, I discovered an extra bracket on the new frames for it, so things can catch you out.
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:27 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Hi David,
Your shock is set up sightly different to mine in that the banjo WAS in the same place as yours but the preload cable was on top. I had the banjo switched to the inside while leaving the preload cable on top of the shock. By rotating it your problems might be sorted, BUT then you havr the issue with where to put the reservoir. With the shock the way it is in your photo, I guess you could put the reservoir under the seat but you may have the charcoal canister... Some bikes don't and mine is one of those, so the reservoir is under the seat. I posted some pics of my setup on another thread and now the site wont let me post them on this thread Of course you could do a canisterectomy and deal with it that way. Keeps the reservoir nice and clean.. Just out of interest, where do your instructions suggest you mount the reservoir? My instructions specified under the seat and maybe your unit is designed for that location...

Vox, I hear you on that stoopid boot. In trying to get the boot to rotate back on, it rotated right off and then I was committed to the tear down. Pissed me off too as it was still primo riding weather here at the time. I also am aware of Pbegin's advice on not letting the FD drop down too far with the risk of the boot popping off. That would be a regrettable mistake to say the least Clymer don't seem to mention that it could happen either.
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:59 AM
voxmagna voxmagna is offline
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

There are probably many bikes out there with the front boot slipped off and the riders not knowing.

It is when they pull back the boot at the RD end to check for a pinion oilseal leak they notice the red rusty gunge in the bottom boot - that is the consequence of all the steel parts inside the swingarm going rusty. Even though I caught mine early, I could still see rust forming on the driveshaft.

I did buy a new boot which would have fitted back a lot easier, which is when I found the old boot had enlarged some, due to the grease and oil picked up. The oil also makes its surface slippery so it wants to keep coming out (of the swingarm). Their clip is a useless idea. If the boot is off, like most of the rubber seals and gaskets, you can revive them by popping into boiling water for a couple of minutes with some detergent added. You think getting the front spline of the driveshaft is a pita, well the boot for me was 3 times as bad which is why I permanently attached it when the swingarm was off.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:37 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Silly front boot.... I was very careful when I installed mine and what do you know, looking at it from the rear with RD/driveshaft out of the way I can see about 3/4" of the clip, looks like the external rubber lip got squeezed between the clip & boot.

Nothing critical,hasn't moved in 2 years but nothing I can fix unless I remove the swingarm, altough I tried with a sneaky tool.

Vox mentioned the preloader on them Showas, looks like quite a few of them do not have enough oil in them.All they are is a bladder that expands when pushing more oil into it. Mine was like that, did not do much,if anything, for preload until the mid-mark. There are instructions somewhere to refill them, looks easy.

Got me wondering, as they never seem to leak,where did the oil go? or.....not enough oil right from the factory??? Just to say that anyone with Showas may not want to trust the rider's manual too much on recommended settings.
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:57 AM
voxmagna voxmagna is offline
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Is the bladder in the adjuster or at the shock end or both? Reminds me of those caravan ball things you can fit in car rear shocks to stiffen up the rear.

When I turn mine it has no resistance until it gets to the first mark. Then a couple of marks on, there is a red mark saying ''Driver 85kg' and since I am 89kg, I am starting a bit forward of that mark. What really matters will be the setting with pillion.

If the front boot starts coming out when the swingarm is lowered, it comes out at the top first (in tension). Then when the swingarm goes back up to the fully loaded position either the boot has just pulled away from the clip, or it has pulled free of the swingarm. If no water is getting down the swingarm, leave it until you need to replace the clutch O ring!
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:16 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Vox, my instructions said to mount the reservoir on the foot peg bracket which is where I put it. I have the charcoal canister so under the seat was not an option as I didn't want to remove it. The instructions also show the banjo bolt on the top of the shock oriented to the outside. As it is now, the preload cable is to the rear of the bike and the cable routes nicely along the back of the fuel tank over to the left side of the bike.
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:43 AM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Bladder is in that big collar thing on the shock. Adjuster is just a reservoir/piston pushing fluid into the bladder. I was dealing with the "sport" shock (pogo) with the yellow spring, they are the same but for the spring. I don't recall mine having a weight setting, 86Kg would be too much for me but I'll look later.

But no, had to run mine between mid/high mark and all the way up with the camping gear and could have used even more. Never bothered adding oil altough it obviously needed some,Ohlins are much nicer on the old back.Tracking on highways has a lot to do with the rebound dampener, squirelly when not set right on Showas, same for the Ohlins. The compression dampener well....no such thing on them Showas and that's where they fault big time on bumpy roads . There....seat of the pants quick adjustments.

Rear Showa, I could have lived with it for a while longer. The front one no way, too many dips and potholes in the twisties out here, I like control over the front end. I feel much safer that way.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:34 PM
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Re: New Ohlins - A tale of joy and frustration (long)

Ditto to what David said about banjo location. I was actually standing in the Ohlins shop with the shock and pictures of me trying to mount it on the bike. Their resident BMW guru Matt looked at the pics and said I had it in the right position. Also, as I discussed in another thread, every picture of an install on an RS or KGT shows the banjo facing out. There is no way I would have even been able to think about mounting that reservoir with the banjo facing into the bike.
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