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Old 03-03-2018, 12:37 PM
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Welshman Welshman is online now
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Some tips from Rapid Training

Rapid Training is a group of current or retired Police Class 1 Motorcyclists who offer training on a 1 to 1 or 1 to 2 basis on the road. I used them regularly when I lived in the UK and this morning one of their periodic newsletters arrived by email, including some useful advice which I thought I would share.

Firstly:

"The Art of Looking Where You're Going
It sounds a bit simplistic to say that one of the most important skills in riding is looking where youíre going but it is painfully true. When God had us on the drawing board he designed our eyes to help us deal with dangers which we faced at the time. Most of these were quite close, the odd Saber Tooth Tiger etc. Hurtling around country lanes at 90 mph probably wasnít even on the desirable list. Because of this we suffer by not being naturally good at stretching our vision. We tend to find our natural focus falls quite a short distance in front of the bike, this leave us with insufficient time to process whatís going on. We need to force our eyes to look as far down the road as is possible, at times this could be a mile away. We need to take in, process, and prioritise vast amounts of information. The majority of it will be discarded unused, but an awful lot of it is vital to our safety. The base line is, if you havenít seen it then you donít know if it is important or not. The information necessary to facilitate your safe passage down the road comes in all sorts, thereís the physical objects such as bends, hillcrests, roundabout and junctions etc., together with movements of other traffic and road users, variations in the road surface and weather conditions. Itís only when we have all the facts that we can make a plan to deal with these combinations so that we ease our way through in the smoothest and least stressful way. The most common mistakes made by riders can almost always be linked to short or poor observation skills. Itís comfy to let your eyes drop to the back of the vehicle in front of you, but this limits your reactions to events, to a second after their reaction. By looking further itís easy to out think our fellow road users. Problems up ahead can involve just the merest degree of throttle closure when the problem is hundreds of metres in front, leaving it to the last minute means instead it turns into a hard application of the brakes. We have to train ourselves to take in everything, even objects on the periphery of your vision. Seeing the moving roof line of a vehicle to your right means the road is either going to turn that way, or you are approaching a junction, both are potentially important clues to whatís ahead. Keeping your eyes on stalks means that Overtaking becomes a doddle, Cornering loses its fears, everything just gets easier. But that said, its against your natural programming so you need practice, practice, practice."

Secondly,

"Space - The Final Frontier
How you manage the space around yourself out on the road can make a huge difference to your riding experience. Intelligent use of the space in front of you and to the rear allows you to interact easily with other traffic and gives you a clear Ďbubbleí of air to operate in.
Good space management begins with follow distance to vehicles ahead. A good rule of thumb is to follow the two second rule. This means that when the vehicle ahead passes a stationary reference point (a drain cover or road sign for example) you should not reach that same point before two seconds has elapsed. This works at all speeds, is effective, and is simple to apply. In wet conditions this gap should be extended even further. The only time you should break this two second rule is if you are moving up to prepare for an overtake.
You have less control of the space behind you but if you have a vehicle following closer than you are comfortable with you have a couple of options. You should extend the distance to the vehicle ahead to increase your safety gap. Sometimes it may be possible to pass the vehicle ahead and the following vehicle then becomes someone elseís problem. In extreme cases pull over and let the vehicle through. Donít be tempted to remonstrate as you are very vulnerable on two wheels.
When you are in town or stopping behind other vehicles make sure you leave a carís length between you and the vehicle ahead, more if it is a large vehicle. This allows you to keep your field of vision open and gives you some space ahead in case you should need an escape route.
Think about how you can use the space around you to your best advantage. By subtle use of your spacing you can influence and control the traffic around you and the best thing is they wonít even know you are doing it!
+ Practice selecting static reference points and applying the two second rule.
+ Use your mirrors to monitor the position of following traffic.
+ Practice stopping a carís length behind stationary traffic, see how much extra vision this creates for you.

and finally,

"Filtering
I could cut this short by saying ďwhat ever goes wrong is your faultĒ and to a certain extent thatís true. But it remains an area that confuses and frustrates. Lets face it there is no point putting up with the hassles of biking, like being cold and wet, if you canít make the most of the advantages. We obviously wouldnít advise sitting in traffic jams if you can make sensible progress. But we do need to ensure that we take extra care and that we cover as many of the dangers as possible. A filtering accident usually occurs at or near a junction or entrance. The typical scenario is that with slow moving queues of traffic, our hero is making his way down the outside of the queue when a car emerges from the line and takes him out. You may think that it is incumbent on the emerging vehicle to ensure that the road is clear, but I regret itís not as simple as that. It has been argued in court that in these circumstances the bike carries some of the blame as it is performing an unusual manoeuvre. This therefore sets a precedent, which courts and insurance companies will use. There is little point arguing against this decision and if your case can be said to follow similar lines, then you are drifting up a certain well-known creek without a means of propulsion.
In essence what we are saying is that vehicles crossing a queue seems to have a bit of a get out if they take you out while doing it. What we therefore need is to be extra careful in areas where this may occur. That doesnít just mean junctions, it includes private entrances and driveways. The only way we can therefore get away with this is if our speed is right. Filtering past stationary traffic needs to be done slowly. If something starts to appear then we need to be able to do something more positive than slamming in the side of it. Keep your pace low but steady, look for gaps appearing and be ready to react accordingly.
Filtering past or between moving queues follows the same principals. Keep the speed just a little higher than the vehicles you are overtaking. Watch for gaps that allow people to swap from one lane to another and be particularly careful approaching turn offs, as you can bet some idiot will be stuck in lane three when he needs the slip road."

You can find out more about Rapid here:

www.rapidtraining.co.uk
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  #2  
Old 03-04-2018, 08:48 AM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Some good advice there Welshman. CSS devotes a whole level to vision. I try and use the two second rule except sometimes I forget at I-BMW rallies.
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Old 03-04-2018, 10:29 AM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnrip
Some good advice there Welshman. CSS devotes a whole level to vision. I try and use the two second rule except sometimes I forget at I-BMW rallies.

That's because of the night before... and someone sprinkled some testosterone on your eggs...
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:30 AM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

The best advice of today, Thanks
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Old 09-24-2018, 02:07 PM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnrip
Some good advice there Welshman. CSS devotes a whole level to vision. I try and use the two second rule except sometimes I forget at I-BMW rallies.

Yes, vision is hugely important for good riding technique. Now, sometimes I've heard people saying that you should constantly be flicking your eyes around looking at everything, and other times it's been worded more like, sweeping your eyes....how would you describe your own visual skills, in terms of how you move your eyes? Is there a difference between flicking and sweeping? Is one better than the other? Why?
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Old 09-24-2018, 02:38 PM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by misti
Yes, vision is hugely important for good riding technique. Now, sometimes I've heard people saying that you should constantly be flicking your eyes around looking at everything, and other times it's been worded more like, sweeping your eyes....how would you describe your own visual skills, in terms of how you move your eyes? Is there a difference between flicking and sweeping? Is one better than the other? Why?

Well I wouldn't want to flick my eyes around looking at everything. I need to concentrate on what I can see that might affect my plan. Staring at some great sight off to the right or left of where the road is going may not be the best idea! I don't think you want to get hung up on the distinction, if there is one, between flicking and sweeping.
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Old 09-24-2018, 03:36 PM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

I think that sweeping is the better choice.



That way, we're giving some constant attention to the direction of travel without continuously refocusing.




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There's never enough time to do it right... But there's always enough time to do it over!
This is only a good thing when applied to riding... or sex!
Ride West 2008
http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?p=191559#post191559
Ride West 2009 http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=24292
Dad & daughter Ride 2011 http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=35470
Andrť Slabbinck 1957-2014 http://www.i-bmw.com/showthread.php?t=50135
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Old 09-25-2018, 02:37 PM
KafkaKaffe KafkaKaffe is offline
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

I read about the distant forward looking technique years ago. It really helps you in compound turns and those nasty increasing or decreasing radius ones.

Basically concentrate as far ahead as you can see.
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:20 PM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Good advice Welshman. I would like to add something here if you don't mind. I currently instruct using the Smiths system that recommends 4 sec following distance. Initially I thought that is too far and I would have road rage and undertaking to deal with but in reality think of it as aim for 4 secs, most time achieve 3 secs leaving worst case when things bunch up at 2 secs.

What ever system you use the most important one is actually having one. Being reactive on a motorcycle puts you at a disadvantage right away.

Welshman we have something in common. We are not English.

Take care out there.

Brian
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Old 10-13-2018, 08:58 AM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasjock
Good advice Welshman. I would like to add something here if you don't mind. I currently instruct using the Smiths system that recommends 4 sec following distance. Initially I thought that is too far and I would have road rage and undertaking to deal with but in reality think of it as aim for 4 secs, most time achieve 3 secs leaving worst case when things bunch up at 2 secs.

What ever system you use the most important one is actually having one. Being reactive on a motorcycle puts you at a disadvantage right away.

Welshman we have something in common. We are not English.

Take care out there.

Brian

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We have more than that in common. We both like drinking whisky!
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Old 10-16-2018, 04:41 AM
ChrisCannin ChrisCannin is offline
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Iíve lost track of the number of posts iíve Seen over years about training etc and as someone who treated learning to ride a motorcycle just like I treated my first job of work my logic has always been you donít buy a powerfull bike till you know how not the other way round and didnít buy a big bike in my first 5 years.

I very quickly realised that I could ride on the road for a 100 years (although iíve Done nearly half of that!!) And not learn how to ride a bike all I would learn is how to survive,hence why I gave up road riding for the best part of 10 years to race an off-road bike and itís where I learned to ride a bike which has saved me/us more than once and itís a completely separate skill from learning to survive on the road.

When in a car or van iíll Have a GPS on the go,the radio on and the phone ringing,when iím On a bike I have absolutely nothing no blue tooth in my helmet or GPS or anything else they are all distractions riding a bike is a pure experience for me,my idea of a distraction ĎDo I need more preload? Is the compression and rebound set right.

As for filtering in traffic iíve Alway found itís the purest form of motorcycling I know no other thing in life where iím As switched on as I am filtering in heavy traffic never been as good as a London courier but good enough to let them overtake give them 50yds and tag on the back
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Old 10-16-2018, 08:56 AM
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Re: Some tips from Rapid Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisCannin
Iíve lost track of the number of posts iíve Seen over years about training etc and as someone who treated learning to ride a motorcycle just like I treated my first job of work my logic has always been you donít buy a powerfull bike till you know how not the other way round and didnít buy a big bike in my first 5 years.

I very quickly realised that I could ride on the road for a 100 years (although iíve Done nearly half of that!!) And not learn how to ride a bike all I would learn is how to survive,hence why I gave up road riding for the best part of 10 years to race an off-road bike and itís where I learned to ride a bike which has saved me/us more than once and itís a completely separate skill from learning to survive on the road.

When in a car or van iíll Have a GPS on the go,the radio on and the phone ringing,when iím On a bike I have absolutely nothing no blue tooth in my helmet or GPS or anything else they are all distractions riding a bike is a pure experience for me,my idea of a distraction ĎDo I need more preload? Is the compression and rebound set right.

As for filtering in traffic iíve Alway found itís the purest form of motorcycling I know no other thing in life where iím As switched on as I am filtering in heavy traffic never been as good as a London courier but good enough to let them overtake give them 50yds and tag on the back
Chris:

I'm with you in regard to no GPS, telephones or music while riding - way too distracting for me. I used to have it all and one day realized all the stuff was making me a bad rider. I don't miss any of it and in fact enjoy the ride a lot more.

As far as filtering through traffic - certainly not my strong point - I'm amazed how good some riders are at it.
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